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Ubuntu 10.04 VHD available for download
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TOPIC: Ubuntu 10.04 VHD available for download
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#2098
Ubuntu 10.04 VHD available for download 8 Years, 5 Months ago Karma: 52
A VHD file is available for download here:

www.vmlite.com/index.php/download/22-appliances

This is for Ubuntu 10.04 32-bit desktop version.



---------- README ------

VMLite VBoot - Linux VHD Boot
updated on May-02-10

Copyright © 2010, VMLite Inc.

1 Overview
1.1 Linux as Real Appliance
With VBoot for Linux, you can pre-install and pre-configure Linux OS and its applications, then distribute the resulting virtual disk file in VHD format. The vhd can boot a real computer, with configuration and apps instantly available. This way, operating systems are truly manageable, as simple as files. We call such a Linux VHD to be a real appliance, in the sense that it boots physical computers.

It's very easy to setup and boot a computer with a vhd file. You download the vhd file, drop it to Windows or Linux file system, then configure the boot loader, and reboot the computer.

1.2 Linux as Virtual Appliance
The exact same vhd file also runs as a virtual machine using virtualization software, such as VMLite Workstation, VirtualBox, Xen and Virtual PC and Hyper-V, etc. By default, it's optimized for VMLite Workstation.

If VMLite Workstation is installed, you can simply double click the ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.mop file to launch the vhd as a virtual machine with VMLite Workstation.

1.3 USB Boot Made Eas
You just need to store the vhd file to usb drive, then hook the USB to different computers to boot. If your computer BIOS does not support USB boot, you need to configure GRUB2 to support USB.

1.4 The sample Ubuntu VHD
The sample ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd is a pre-installed 32-bit Ubuntu 9.10 desktop version in English.

self growing disk with disk capacity of 100G, with initial size about 3G

root username/password: user/welcome

1.5 Make your own Ubuntu 9.10 32-bit VHD
If you don't want to use our pre-built ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd file, you can go ahead to create your own .vhd file. Follow the following instructions:

Download VMLite Workstation, and create a Linux (Ubuntu 32-bit) virtual machine using Ubuntu 9.10 32-bit CDROM

Make sure you use .VHD file, run from command line: "VBoxManage createhd --format vhd --filename c:\ubuntu-1004\ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd -size 102400 --remember"

After the vhd file is created, you need to download our patched initrd and VBoot Loader files from our download page. You place your own .VHD file to the same directory as VBoot files.

2 System Requirements
Windows 2000 and Later, 32- and 64- bit, NTFS file systemGRUB2 or other compatible boot loaders, 32- and 64- bit

Mac - to be supported soon

4G disk space

3 Download and Extract
The sample Ubuntu 9.10 package is a few hundred MB, so it will take quite some time to download, and it's recommended to use a download manager, such as FlashGet.

Once download is complete, first you need to extract the file, which is in .7z format. More info can be found at www.7-zip.org/download.html. On Windows, you can use WinRar or 7Zip to extract the file. On Linux, you can use the following commands to install 7zip, and unzip the file:

sudo apt-get install p7zip

p7zip -d ubuntu-1004.7z

In order to boot a computer using the vhd file, make sure that it's not extracted to a network drive, or to another virtual disk. The vhd file must reside in a basic volume on internal or external hard disks (e.g., USB drives), otherwise, it won't boot.

4 Install on Windows
If your current host is Windows, you need to install VBoot loader, and add a boot entry to Windows boot manager. In addition, you need to tell VBoot where to find the vhd file.

4.1 Automatic Setup by running setup.exe
It's highly recommend that you use this method to setup VBoot on Windows, since it's extremely simple and automates everything. You simply double click setup.exe on 32-bit Windows, or setup64.exe on 64-bit Windows. The setup utility will install VBoot Loader, and configure the Windows boot loader to contain an entry to boot the Linux VHD.

After setup.exe is successfully run, you reboot the computer, and you should see a "VBoot - Ubuntu VHD Boot" entry as the last one, select this entry to boot to Linux.

4.2 Manual Setup
If somehow the automatic setup doesn't work, then you can perform the following manual steps:

4.2.1 Copy VBoot Loader Files

The VBoot loader is based on GNU GRUB2, and its files are located in vboot sub directory.

vbootldr.mbr and vbootldr are the two critical boot loader files that must be copied to the root directory of a drive, typical C:\.
The fonts directory contains font files to be used by our boot loader.
The grub directory contains grub2 modules, and the very import grub.cfg configuration file.
For example, if you want to copy the files to C:\, you need to copy the vboot directory to c:\, so you will have c:\vboot directory. Then you must copy vbootldr.mbr and vbootldr to c:\.

The following commands can be used to copy the files. Make sure to run from the extracted dir.

md c:\vboot
xcopy /s vboot c:\vboot
copy vboot\vbootldr c:\
copy vboot\vbootldr.mbr c:\

4.2.2 Configure grub.cfg

A sample grub.cfg file is placed in c:\vboot\grub directory (or d:\vboot\grub depending on where you have copied the files). This is the GRUB2 configuratrion file to load operating systems. Inside this file, the vhd file path is hard coded, and thus you have to modify it.

grub.cfg is a text file that you can use notepad to open and modify. The relevant portion is shown below:

menuentry "VHD Ubuntu, Linux 2.6.32-21-generic" {
insmod vhd
vhd vhd0 (hd0,1)/ubuntu-1004/ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd --partitions
linux (vhd0,1)/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-21-generic root=/dev/sda1 vloop=/ubuntu-1004/ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd quiet splash
initrd (vhd0,1)/boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-21-generic
}

menuentry groups a specific operating system. The first line insmod vhd inserts our vhd.mod module to the boot loader. vhd.mod is a GRUB2 module that treats a vhd file as hard disk, and allows GRUB2 to read files from the vhd. For example, the Linux kernel and initrd are loaded from the vhd file, as configured above.

There are three paths (as shown in red) related to the vhd file that you need to change depending on the directory to which the vhd file is extracted.

The vhd path (hd0,1)/ubuntu-1004/ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd is in GRUB2 format where (hd0,1) indicates hard disk 0 and partition 1, with the rest is the absolute path in UNIX format. For example, if your vhd file is inside a folder called 123 on an external USB disk, then you need to change this path to something like (hd1,1)/123/ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd. The path immediately after vloop= should be the same absolute path without the disk number and partition number.

The root path is the Linux device name for the disk where the vhd file resides. The number is the partition number, and the letter 'a', 'b', 'c', etc, represents which disk. For (hd0,1), the name would be /dev/sda1; For (hd1,1), it would be /dev/sdb1; For (hd2,4), it would be /dev/sdc4, etc.

44.2.3 Configure Windows Boot Loader

Once VBoot Loader and the vhd file are ready, you need to configure Windows boot manager, so you can boot to the Linux VHD. You need to append the vbootldr.mbr entry to the [operating systems] section. The following is sample boot.ini file with VBoot entry added at the very last. Shown in red is what you need to add to boot.ini. Change C: to whatever drive you have copied VBoot Loader files.

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
C:\vbootldr.mbr="VBoot - Ubuntu VHD Boot"

4.2.3.2 Windows Vista/2008/7
Windows Vista and above use a different mechanism other than boot.init to boot, and you need to run bcdedit.exe to make changes to the boot manager. The following are the commands to run if you have copied VBoot Loader to drive C:. You must rum these commands as Administrator. Go to Windows Start menu > All Programs > Accessories, then right click on "Command Prompt", then select "Run As Administrator". Once command prompt window is open, you can enter these commands.

bcdedit /create {D3DCE997-7447-41FC-9740-A8D20EE3BF55} /d "Ubuntu VHD Boot" /application BOOTSECTOR
bcdedit /set {D3DCE997-7447-41FC-9740-A8D20EE3BF55} device partition=C:
bcdedit /set {D3DCE997-7447-41FC-9740-A8D20EE3BF55} path \vbootldr.mbr
bcdedit /displayorder {D3DCE997-7447-41FC-9740-A8D20EE3BF55} /addlast
bcdedit /timeout 30

5 Install on Linux
On Linux systems, there is no need to install VBoot Loader. Instead, you only need to add an entry to your current boot loader so the Linux VHD can be booted.

5.1 Configure GRUB2
You can edit the GRUB2 config file, /boot/grub/grub.cfg, using any text editor, and insert an entry like the following:

menuentry "VHD Ubuntu, Linux 2.6.32-21-generic" {
linux (hd0,1)/ubuntu-1004/vmlinuz-2.6.32-21-generic root=/dev/sda1 vloop=/ubuntu-1004/ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd quiet splash
initrd (hd0,1)/ubuntu-1004/initrd.img-2.6.32-21-generic
}

There are some subtle differences between Linux and Windows host. On Windows where our GRUB2 module,vhd.mod, is available, you can configure GRUB2 to load the Linux kerenl and initrd from the exactly same vhd file, whereas on Linux systems, the kernel and initrd are separate files residing externally. In other words, on Windows, it's strictly only one vhd file is required; whereas on Linux, 3 files (kernel, initrd, vhd) are required. We will try to make the vhd.mod module to support Linux file system soon.

Obviously, you need to change the paths depending on the directory to which the kernel, initrd and vhd files are extracted.

The path (hd0,1) indicates hard disk 0 and partition 1, with the rest is the absolute path in UNIX format. For example, if your vhd file is inside a folder called 123 on an external USB disk, then you need to change this path to something like (hd1,1)/123/ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd. The path immediately after vloop= should be the same absolute path without the disk number and partition number.

The root path is the Linux device name for the disk where the vhd file resides. The number is the partition number, and the letter 'a', 'b', 'c', etc, represents which disk. For (hd0,1), the name would be /dev/sda1; For (hd1,1), it would be /dev/sdb1; For (hd2,4), it would be /dev/sdc4, etc.

5.3 Configure Legacy GRUB
For GRUB 0.97 and similar, you can add an entry to your GRUB config file, /boot/grub/menu.lst, using any text editor, and insert an entry like the following:

title VBoot - Ubuntu VHD Boot
kernel /boot/ubuntu-1004/vmlinuz-2.6.32-21-generic root=/dev/sda1 vloop=/boot/ubuntu-1004/ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd quiet splash
initrd /boot/ubuntu-1004/initrd.img-2.6.32-21-generic
quiet

Obviously, you need to adjust the paths according to your own locations for the Linux kernel, initrd and vhd file.

5.4 Configure other Boot Loaders
We haven't tested other Linux boot loaders, such as LILO and SYSLINUX, but they may work as well. The important thing is to add vloop= argument to the Linux kernel line:

root=/dev/sda1 vloop=/boot/ubuntu-1004/ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd

The above tells where to locate the vhd file.

6 Making your own Linux VHD File
If you want to make your own Linux VHD file to boot, right noow you can do so only if your Linux kernel version is compatible with Ubuntu 9.10 or 10.04. After we release the source code, you can create VHDs by yourself for all Linux kernel versions.

Follow the following steps:

1) Download and install VMLite Workstation.


2) Create a VHD virtual disk file, for example, you can run the following command to create a vhd file with disk capacity of 100G:

VBoxManage createhd --format vhd --filename ubuntu-1004-desktop-i386.vhd -size 102400 --remember

3) Create a vm, attach the VHD file created from step 2), boot teh vm using Ubuntu 9.10 or 10.04 32-bit CDROM, and install Ubuntu inside the vm.

3) After the VHD is ready, you download an initrd file from us, and you will be able to boot the vhd.
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#2100
Re:Ubuntu 10.04 VHD available for download 8 Years, 5 Months ago Karma: 0
awesome!

thanks.
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#2107
Re:Ubuntu 10.04 VHD available for download 8 Years, 5 Months ago Karma: 52
The 64-bit version of Ubuntu 10.04 VHD is also available now for downloading
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#2113
Re:Ubuntu 10.04 VHD available for download 8 Years, 5 Months ago Karma: 0
Hi,
I can't boot my created ubuntu-10.04 VHD! I attached a photo from my laptop screen that shows boot error.
what's the problem?!
I'm sure that problem is not from my boot options, because I use "MobaLiveCD_v2.1.exe" from my windows installation and then by "Run the LiveUSB" option and select laptop boot partition and then select boot option for ubuntu-10.4 I can boot ubuntu-10.04 VHD!!!!!!
srazi
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#2115
Re:Ubuntu 10.04 VHD available for download 8 Years, 5 Months ago Karma: 52
Ok, we know this issue, due to some synchronization problem. I will try to post a new initrd for you to try. a couple of hours.
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#2116
Re:Ubuntu 10.04 VHD available for download 8 Years, 5 Months ago Karma: 0

Thanks you
srazi
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